Archive for the 'publicity and promotion' Category

Read This Post! And Other Effective Titles

I led a writers’ workshop up in Calgary last week (Waves at IFWA members — Hi, guys!) and had a terrific time.  I worked with serious writers who were as committed to being good critics of their colleagues’ work as they were to improving their own writing.  I learned as much from them as I […]

The New Book

My new book, The Hollow Crown, is now available. It just came out this week. I love this book. I think it’s one of the best I’ve written and I want everyone to read it. Everyone. Hint Hint. But seriously (I was being serious), I want to talk about this book in another context. I […]

ROBIN HOOD and “Creative Ownership”

So, I’m starting off with a little self-promotion. I have written the novelization for the new Ridley Scott treatment of Robin Hood, starring Russell Crowe and Cate Blanchett. The movie will be released on May 14; the book comes out next Tuesday, April 27. I have always wanted to write a media tie-in; I always […]

Book Cover Design 101: Unleashing the Monster

Authors are capricious gods. We’re always interfering in the lives of our characters. We hate it when life’s too easy for them. We crave conflict and struggle and whenever the momentum sags, we think: what can I do to really inconvenience my characters? Some authors send for the ex-boyfriend that the heroine never really got […]

Writing the Sequel

So my new book Bitter Night came out last week. I’ll indulge in a little bit of Shameless Self Promotion below, but before that, an actual post. I’ve been working on the sequel to this book, and it’s one of the hardest books I’ve written. I know where I’m going, but I’ve rewritten the beginning […]

The scary bits

In just under six months, my first book will be published. It’s a strange time for me. On the one hand, six months feels like a long time to wait; on the other hand, things are really starting to get moving, in an awful lot of ways. I’ve started to hear from people who’ve already […]

What then should we do…?

Ah, the vexed question of promotion, and marketing, and “getting out there”.   Used to be, if you got picked up by a halfway-decent publishing house, your book got a publicist whose job it would be to make sure that the world at large knew about the book’s existence when it turned up as an […]

BURNING SKIES launch interview

Next up we’ve got David J. Williams, author of BURNING SKIES, now out from Bantam! Q:  So what’s BURNING SKIES? A:  The follow-up to last year’s MIRRORED HEAVENS—the second book in the Autumn Rain trilogy. Q:  So I gotta read MIRRORED HEAVENS first? A:  Your call.   I wrote BURNING SKIES so that you can leap […]

MythOS Launch Interview

We’re talking today with Kelly McCullough about MythOS, his new book in the Ravirn Series that’s out today. Q: New book? A: Yes indeed. Q: What and why? A: Cyber-fantasy with hacking as sorcery…again. It is book IV. And, because they pay me of course. No, that’s not really it. Well not all of it, […]

Dusting off the files

The only thing weirder than seeing your (first) novel out there is seeing a different version of it.  It’s so strange it’s almost like getting a second novel published!   Though in some ways, the recently-released mass-market version of Mirrored Heavens is a different novel, because (unlike the trade paperback), the mass market contains a […]

Author Information

David B. Coe

David B. Coe (http://www.DavidBCoe.com) is the Crawford award-winning author of the LonTobyn Chronicle, the Winds of the Forelands quintet, the Blood of the Southlands trilogy, and a number of short stories. Writing as D.B. Jackson (http://www.dbjackson-author.com), he is the author of the Thieftaker Chronicles, a blend of urban fantasy, mystery, and historical fiction. David is also part of the Magical Words group blog (http://magicalwords.net), and co-author of How To Write Magical Words: A Writer’s Companion. In 2010 he wrote the novelization of director Ridley Scott’s movie, Robin Hood. His books have been translated into more than a dozen languages. Visit site.

Diana Pharaoh Francis

Diana Pharaoh Francis has written the fantasy novel trilogy that includes Path of Fate, Path of Honor and Path of Blood. Path of Fate was nominated for the Mary Roberts Rinehart Award. Recently released was The Turning Tide, third in her Crosspointe Chronicles series (look also for The Cipher and The Black Ship). In October 2009, look for Bitter Night, a contemporary fantasy. Diana teaches in the English Department at the University of Montana Western, and is an avid lover of all things chocolate. Visit site.

David B. Coe

David B. Coe (http://www.DavidBCoe.com) is the Crawford award-winning author of the LonTobyn Chronicle, the Winds of the Forelands quintet, the Blood of the Southlands trilogy, and a number of short stories. Writing as D.B. Jackson (http://www.dbjackson-author.com), he is the author of the Thieftaker Chronicles, a blend of urban fantasy, mystery, and historical fiction. David is also part of the Magical Words group blog (http://magicalwords.net), and co-author of How To Write Magical Words: A Writer’s Companion. In 2010 he wrote the novelization of director Ridley Scott’s movie, Robin Hood. His books have been translated into more than a dozen languages. Visit site.

Chris Dolley

Chris Dolley is an English author of SF mysteries and fun urban fantasies, a pioneer computer games designer, and the man who convinced the UK media that Cornwall had risen up and declared independence. His novel Resonance (2005, Baen) was the first book to be plucked from Baen’s electronic slush pile. He now lives in France with his wife, a dolmen, and a frightening collection of animals. His memoir French Fried (2010, BVC) has just been released. Visit site.

Diana Pharaoh Francis

Diana Pharaoh Francis has written the fantasy novel trilogy that includes Path of Fate, Path of Honor and Path of Blood. Path of Fate was nominated for the Mary Roberts Rinehart Award. Recently released was The Turning Tide, third in her Crosspointe Chronicles series (look also for The Cipher and The Black Ship). In October 2009, look for Bitter Night, a contemporary fantasy. Diana teaches in the English Department at the University of Montana Western, and is an avid lover of all things chocolate. Visit site.

Stephanie Burgis

Stephanie Burgis is an American writer who lives in Yorkshire, England, with her husband, fellow writer Patrick Samphire, their son "Mr Darcy", and their crazy-sweet border collie mix, Maya. Her Regency fantasy trilogy for kids, The Unladylike Adventures of Kat Stephenson, will be published by Atheneum Books, an imprint of Simon & Schuster, in 2010, 2011, and 2012, beginning with Book One: A Most Improper Magick. She has also published short stories in a variety of magazines, anthologies, and podcasts, including Strange Horizons, Beneath Ceaseless Skies, and Escape Pod. You can find out more, or read/listen to her published stories online, at her website. Visit site.

Alma Alexander

Alma Alexander is a novelist, short story writer and anthologist whose books include High Fantasy ("Hidden Quen""Changer of Days"), historical fantasy ("Secrets of Jin Shei", "Embers of Heaven"), contemporary fantasy ("Midnight at Spanish gardens") and YA (the Worldweavers series, the Were Chronicles). She lives in the Pacific Northwest with her husband and two cats. Visit site.

David J. Williams

Descended from Australian convicts, David J. Williams nonetheless managed to be born in Hertfordshire, England, and subsequently moved to Washington D.C. just in time for Nixon’s impeachment. Graduating from Yale with a degree in history some time later, he narrowly escaped the life of a graduate student and ended up doing time in Corporate America, which drove him so crazy he started moonlighting on video games and (as he got even crazier) novels. The Autumn Rain trilogy sold to Bantam in the summer of 2007; the release of THE MACHINERY OF LIGHT completes the series. Visit site.

Kelly McCullough

Kelly McCullough is a fantasy and science fiction author. He lives in Wisconsin with his physics professor wife and a small herd of cats. His novels include the WebMage and Fallen Blade series—Penguin/ACE. His short fiction has appeared in numerous venues including Writers of the Future and Weird Tales. He also dabbles in science fiction as science education with The Chronicles of the Wandering Star—part of an NSF-funded science curriculum—and the science comic Hanny & the Mystery of the Voorwerp, which he co-authored and co-edited—funding provided by NASA and the Hubble Space Telescope. Visit site.

David J. Williams

Descended from Australian convicts, David J. Williams nonetheless managed to be born in Hertfordshire, England, and subsequently moved to Washington D.C. just in time for Nixon’s impeachment. Graduating from Yale with a degree in history some time later, he narrowly escaped the life of a graduate student and ended up doing time in Corporate America, which drove him so crazy he started moonlighting on video games and (as he got even crazier) novels. The Autumn Rain trilogy sold to Bantam in the summer of 2007; the release of THE MACHINERY OF LIGHT completes the series. Visit site.

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